Funding Announcements

Open Funding Opportunity Announcements (FOAs)

20-1-01 Graduate Research Innovation (GRIN) Award More Information Actions
Specific objectives related to management are to enhance student exposure to and interaction with fire and fuels managers, develop appreciation and understanding of fire and fuels managers information and research needs, and augment already planned and funded master or doctoral research to develop information and/or products useful to managers. The JFSP also is interested in understanding the science needs of decision-makers, which provides an opportunity for students to enhance their understanding of how science can be used to inform fire-related policy. As a result, these awards are intended to enable graduate students to conduct research that will supplement and enhance the quality, scope, or applicability of their thesis or dissertation to develop information and products useful to managers and decision-makers. Proposals must demonstrate relevance to fire, fuels, or resource management and include means to directly communicate with managers, when applicable, regarding project outcomes. Proposals must be directly related to the mission and goals of JFSP to be considered. Applicants are encouraged to search the JFSP website (www.firescience.gov) to learn more about the scope of JFSP activities. In addition, proposals must directly address management- or policy-related questions related to one or more of the following topic areas: " Fuels management and fire behavior " Changing fire environment " Emissions and air quality " Fire effects and post-fire recovery " Relative impacts of prescribed fire versus wildfire " Human dimensions of fire

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Closes on Dec 05, 2019

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20-2-01 Performance of fuel breaks and fuel break systems More Information Actions
The objectives of this task statement are to: (1) identify or develop metrics (standards) to assess fuel break and fuel break system performance in terms of controlling wildfire behavior, aiding in wildfire suppression operations, and minimizing wildfire risk and impacts to valued resources (2) evaluate fuel breaks and fuel break systems using these metrics, and (3) identify necessary improvements in the implementation of operational fire behavior models and their data input requirements relative to assessing fuel break and fuel break system performance. Proposers must address both research needs 1 and 2 below to be considered responsive to this task statement. Research need 3 is optional. Research proposals are sought that identify or develop metrics to assess fuel break and fuel break system performance, evaluate fuel break and fuel break systems using these metrics, and investigate the applicability of these metrics to operational fire behavior models for a variety of regions and vegetation types. Proposals should clearly distinguish, as applicable, the different management objectives that influence fuel break versus fuel break system design and how this may affect the selection of appropriate performance metrics for fuel breaks versus fuel break systems. When addressing the performance of fuel break systems (as opposed to individual fuel break performance) at landscape and regional scales, proposals may consider metrics that account for both the positive and negative aspects of system performance (e.g., impacts to plant and animal communities, ecosystem resilience). Research proposals should consider fire environment factors such as fuel moisture, wind, and relative humidity under which fuel breaks with different characteristics (bare ground, vegetative) perform as intended (versus under extreme weather conditions). Research proposals also should consider using a combination of both empirical and modeling approaches to evaluate, calibrate, or validate their findings. Specific research needs include: 1. Identify or develop quantitative and qualitative metrics (standards) to assess fuel break and fuel break system performance. Metrics should be based on end-user needs (management objectives) and enable quantifying how fuel breaks and fuel break systems affect short- and long-term risk from wildfire to firefighters, human communities, and cultural and natural resources. In addition, proposed metrics also should enable distinguishing the costs versus benefits of fuel break systems to valued resources. 2. Using identified or developed metrics, evaluate performance of existing or planned fuel breaks and fuel break systems, with respect to fire behavior, operational response, wildfire risk, and threats to valued resources, and identify factors (e.g., burning condition, treatment type, area treated) that influence fuel break and fuel break system performance. 3. Identify necessary improvements in the implementation of operational fire behavior models, modeling processes, and data input requirements (e.g., fuel models) through model calibration, evaluation, and validation that incorporate the standards above and support overall improvement in model output interpretation as a means to assess fuel break and fuel break system performance.

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Closes on Dec 05, 2019

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20-3-01 Regional Science Exchange and Outreach More Information Actions
The objective of this task statement is to solicit proposals to lead and execute a particular regional fire science exchange for a period of two years. The JFSP funds and provides oversight to a national collaborative of 15 regional wildland fire science exchanges: the Fire Science Exchange Network (FSEN). The FSEN provides the most relevant, current wildland fire science information to federal, state, local, tribal, and private stakeholders within ecologically similar regions. The FSEN brings fire, fuel, natural resource, and land managers, practitioners, and scientists together to address regional wildland fire management needs and challenges. Please see the JFSP website (www.firescience.gov) for additional information about the FSEN. This solicitation is seeking individual proposals (i.e., each proposal must be specific to one region) for the following four regions of the FSEN: Alaska, California, Great Basin, and Pacific Islands.

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Closes on Dec 05, 2019

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16-1-01 Implications of changing ecosystems in selected regions More Information Actions
This task consists of two related components. The first component is a science assessment, which can include a synthesis of existing knowledge, or research aimed at producing new knowledge. New data must be interpreted and presented in a form that supports an assessment of management implications. The second component is an integration and interpretation of this information in some form of operational scenario analysis depicting managers ability to meet land and resource management objectives. Proposals must include both components. Proposals submitted to address this task must address research questions in one or more of the following regions: "Alaska", "Pacific Northwest", "Northern Rockies" View FOA

Closed on Nov 13, 2015

16-1-02 Social and regulatory barriers and facilitators to implementing prescribed fire More Information Actions
The JFSP is interested in research that examines factors that influence managers decisions regarding implementation of prescribed fire, how they deal with tradeoffs, and when social and regulatory factors act as barriers or facilitators to use of prescribed fire. Submitted proposals must address one or more of the following sets of questions: " Social barriers and facilitators: What level of public opinion regarding prescribed fire actually impacts prescribed fire implementation? What is the role of collaborative efforts or advocacy groups in facilitating or limiting prescribed fire? " Regulatory barriers and facilitators: What federal, state, and local regulations and agency guidelines are used in decision-making regarding prescribed fire implementation? What barriers and opportunities do these regulations and guidelines present for applying prescribed fire? How do managers make decisions when regulations and guidelines conflict with use of prescribed fire for wildfire mitigation goals and objectives? For all sets of questions, the JFSP is interested in projects that examine the relative importance of different barriers/facilitators and that demonstrate how key social and regulatory factors vary by region, agency or other important influence. The JFSP is also interested in projects that document successful strategies managers have employed to overcome barriers to prescribed fire implementation. View FOA

Closed on Nov 13, 2015

16-1-03 Maintenance and restoration of sagebrush habitat in the Great Basin More Information Actions
FSP is interested in research that evaluates and improves the effectiveness of vegetation treatments intended to protect or restore the diversity and productivity of sagebrush ecosystems and sage grouse habitat in the Great Basin. The scope of requested proposals includes evaluation of past, ongoing, or newly proposed operational treatments, and can include both a synthesis of existing knowledge and/or new research. This work is in direct support to Department of Interior Secretarial Order # 3336. The intent of this task is to support field application of operational vegetation treatments that could be used to meet the objectives of the DOI Integrated Rangeland Fire Management Strategy (http://www.forestsandrangelands.gov/rangeland/documents/IntegratedRangelandFireManagementStrategy_FinalReportMay2015.pdf). Investigators are strongly encouraged to involve field practitioners in the proposed work, e.g., conduct field workshops to define operational field treatments, or to jointly interpret the management implications of research results. If new field treatments are proposed, the proposal must show concrete evidence of the involvement, support, and ability to implement the proposed field treatments by the responsible field managers. Evidence could include involvement of land managers as Co-Investigators, description of coordination with land managers in the proposal, evidence in the proposal that the details of treatment implementation have been adequately considered, and/or letters of support. Submitted proposals must address at least one of the following questions: " What are the most effective treatment options to increase resilience and resistance of sagebrush stands that are prone to invasion by undesired plants (e.g., stands that lack perennial grass and forb cover), or have an existing understory of invasive annual plants? " What are the best treatment options to increase desired plant establishment (i.e., survival, species composition, density, rate of recovery) in post-fire sagebrush stands? " Where and under what conditions should seed, seedlings, or a combination be used to meet habitat or ecosystem objectives, especially for establishing sagebrush and other desirable shrubs? Proposals that focus on other research questions will not be considered. View FOA

Closed on Nov 13, 2015

16-1-04 Effects of fire on tree mortality More Information Actions
The JFSP seeks research on fire-induced tree mortality that will lead to better predictive models of tree mortality for a wider range of species and conditions. Specifically, JFSP is interested in research that: " Uses existing or newly developed datasets from prescribed fires or wildfires to evaluate existing tree mortality models " Incorporates new data on fire-induced tree mortality into existing models so that they can be used over a wider range of conditions " Improves our understanding of the fire-induced physiological basis for tree mortality The JFSP is particularly interested in studies that incorporate mortality from root, stem and crown damage. Any new models or improvements to existing models must be evaluated against independent datasets. Improvements to existing models should be delivered as modules for inclusion in existing software systems. View FOA

Closed on Nov 13, 2015

16-1-05 Post-fire landscape management More Information Actions
The JFSP invites proposals that investigate the effectiveness of post-fire management actions in both forested and non-forested ecosystems. Potential investigators are encouraged to propose research that supports development of long-term strategies for management of post-fire landscapes. For example, studies are sought that provide information on where and when specific treatments are likely to be effective in reducing undesired fire effects or encouraging recovery of desired vegetation and fuels. Submitted proposals must address questions from both of the topic areas listed below: " Ecological  What characteristics of post-fire landscapes are shaping the temporal and spatial patterns of vegetation and fuels, and how are these patterns changing in response to changing climate or wildfire management strategies? What conditions or thresholds result in novel landscapes and fire patterns? Where and to what extent are post-fire landscapes missing key ecosystem components (e.g., type change)? " Management  How have past post-fire management actions (e.g., timber salvage, grazing, re-planting or re-seeding, fuels management) influenced fire severity and effects? What kinds and patterns of management actions (e.g., fuels management) can enhance landscape resilience in terms of fire severity, extent, and effects? How does post-fire treatment scale influence treatment effectiveness? Investigators are encouraged to interpret and recommend post-fire management actions for operational landscapes. Recommendations should be made jointly with fire, fuels and resource managers working in landscapes with a history of large and novel fire events. Possible forums to jointly develop recommendation include joint workshops, field tours, or spatially and temporally specific scenario-building exercises. Investigators are encouraged to work with members of the JFSP Fire Science Exchange Network (www.firescience.gov) to plan and implement these activities. View FOA

Closed on Nov 13, 2015

16-1-06 Regional need - Consortium of Appalachian Fire Managers and Scientist Season of prescribed burning to reach management objectives More Information Actions
Regional needs represent high priority science gaps that have been identified by and are applicable to managers and researchers within individual JFSP Fire Science Exchanges. The JFSP intends to invest in research to address these information gaps to better serve regional manager needs. Proposals to address regional needs are solicited for specific regions within the JFSP Fire Science Exchange Network. Proposed studies must be conducted within the defined boundaries of the identified exchange (see http://www.firescience.gov/JFSP_exchanges.cfm). Investigators will be expected to work with the identified exchange to assure the proposed research meets manager needs and has robust science exchange activities. Proposals will be limited to a maximum of $200,000. Research over the past 15 years has revealed the critical role of fire in most Appalachian ecosystems. However, some states still use fire only on a limited basis and other states do not use fire at all. Most prescribed burning and almost all fire research has been with relatively cool fires, usually burning in middle to late winter. Yet, current research emphasizes that management objectives for stand structure, fuels, and vegetation cannot be reached by a single winter fire and few objectives can be reached by two or three winter fires. The most common questions asked by fire managers over the Appalachian Mountains deal with expanding their burning window and meeting objectives quickly. To do so, information is needed on the impacts of prescribed fire in seasons other than winter on stand structure, surface fuels, and vegetation. The JFSP is interested in research that establishes new study sites or re-measures previously established studies that compare impacts of season of burning and/or numbers of burns on stand structure, fuels and vegetation. Submitted proposals must address one or more of the following questions: " How do differences in weather, fuel moisture, and fuel loading associated with season affect fire intensity, fire behavior, and fire severity? " Does burning at different seasons create differences in stand structure? How are forest floor vegetation, the shrub layer, and the canopy layer effected? Of particular interest are impacts to litter, duff, and soil exposure. " Which season of burning improves vegetative composition by promoting density or cover of desirable species (native gramminoids, forbs, fire-dependent trees, and others) and/or reducing density or cover of off-site species (red maple, white pine, mountain laurel, rhododendron, non-native invasive plants, and others)? The Consortium of Appalachian Fire Managers and Scientists (CAFMS) is fortunate to have a number of demonstration sites through its partnership with the Fire Learning Network, and two research sites (Fire Surrogate in NC and OH) that provide some of the needed information. However, these can only serve as the beginning of a network of sites because many demonstration sites have no experimental design and those that do are limited in number and scope. Investigators are expected to work with CAFMS to incorporate any new or existing experimental units used for the proposed study into this existing network of demonstration sites. View FOA

Closed on Nov 13, 2015

16-1-07 Regional needs - Oak Woodlands and Forest Fire Consortium Prescribed fire effects on wood products More Information Actions
Regional needs represent high priority science gaps that have been identified by and are applicable to managers and researchers within individual JFSP Fire Science Exchanges. The JFSP intends to invest in research to address these information gaps to better serve regional manager needs. Proposals to address regional needs are solicited for specific regions within the JFSP Fire Science Exchange Network. Proposed studies must be conducted within the defined boundaries of the identified exchange (see http://www.firescience.gov/JFSP_exchanges.cfm). Investigators will be expected to work with the identified exchange to assure the proposed research meets manager needs and has robust science exchange activities. Proposals will be limited to a maximum of $200,000. Forest management practices that include prescribed burning have been increasingly used in recent decades throughout the Oak Woodlands & Forests Fire Consortium region. Management objectives often intend to accommodate multiple land uses (e.g., timber, wildlife, water, recreation), restore remnant fire-dependent natural communities, promote biodiversity, and improve forest health and ecosystem function. While recent studies have addressed the effects of fire on various ecosystem attributes, the effects of prescribed fire on forest products and resulting forest valuation remain unstudied. Such information is needed in order to plan and implement prescribed fires to meet multiple management objectives. The Joint Fire Science Program seeks proposals that evaluate the effects of prescribed fire on the economic value of wood products, including attributes such as desirable species, product quality or grades, and wood volumes. Submitted proposals must directly address the question: " How do fire treatments change the economic value of wood products? Proposals are expected to include a combination of new data collection and forest simulation modeling leading to quantitative analysis of fire effects on wood products. Proposed research should compare differences and similarities in wood products between stands with and without fire treatments. Proposals should demonstrate that study areas have undergone significant changes in vegetation conditions due to fire treatments, alone or in conjunction with other treatments such as mechanical thinning or herbicide application. View FOA

Closed on Nov 13, 2015

16-1-08 Regional needs - Southern Fire Exchange Prescribed fire smoke emissions More Information Actions
Regional needs represent high priority science gaps that have been identified by and are applicable to managers and researchers within individual JFSP Fire Science Exchanges. The JFSP intends to invest in research to address these information gaps to better serve regional manager needs. Proposals to address regional needs are solicited for specific regions within the JFSP Fire Science Exchange Network. Proposed studies must be conducted within the defined boundaries of the identified exchange (see http://www.firescience.gov/JFSP_exchanges.cfm). Investigators will be expected to work with the identified exchange to assure the proposed research meets manager needs and has robust science exchange activities. Proposals will be limited to a maximum of $200,000. Despite an extensive research and modeling history to understand and predict air quality impacts of prescribed burning in the South, many questions still surround the actual contributions of prescribed fire to smoke emissions on a local basis. The great number of prescribed fires in southern states along with a wide network of air quality monitors provides opportunities to address questions regarding the discernible effect of prescribed fire on ground-level particulate matter and ozone levels. Yet, a lack of a unified record of prescribed fire occurrence and characteristics in southern states precludes such analyses. The JFSP is interested in proposals to compile data on prescribed fire occurrence and characteristics needed to run fuel consumption and smoke models, and to update datasets of actual air quality with data from air quality monitors in more recent years. Investigators should then use the dataset to find case studies to address one or more of the following questions: " What indication has the monitor network given that prescribed fire has had a discernable effect on ground-level particulate matter and ozone? " Do current emissions estimation and smoke dispersion tools provide adequate predictions for prescribed burn planning? " Are smoke management programs effective in minimizing ground-level particulate matter and ozone? Research funded for this task will be based on existing data. No substantial new field data collection will be funded through this task. Investigators are encouraged to propose an approach to test and demonstrate a prototype, unified, multi-state fire occurrence database. View FOA

Closed on Nov 13, 2015

16-2-01 Graduate Research Innovation (GRIN) Award More Information Actions
JFSP recognizes that graduate students of today are the managers, scientists, and leaders of tomorrow. These awards allow graduate students to conduct research that will supplement and enhance the quality, scope, or applicability of their thesis or dissertation, and to build skills needed for independent inquiry. Proposals must demonstrate relevance to fire, fuels or resource managers and include means to directly communicate with managers regarding project outcomes. Proposals must be directly related to the mission and goals of JFSP to be considered. Applicants are encouraged to search the JFSP website (www.firescience.gov) to learn more about the scope of JFSP activities. In addition, proposals must directly address one of the following topics: " Climate change and fire (e.g., fire behavior, fire effects, fire regime) " Post-fire recovery (e.g., effects of burn severity, treatment effectiveness) " Smoke or emissions assessments " Maintenance and restoration of Great Basin sagebrush habitat " Social issues and fire (e.g., community preparation, transfer and use of science, public perceptions, fire-adapted communities) Proposals on other topics will not be reviewed. Proposals must describe new, unfunded work that extends ongoing or planned research that is the subject of a thesis or dissertation that has been approved by the graduate students advisory committee. View FOA

Closed on Nov 13, 2015

16-3-01 New Science Initiative - Ecological and social dimensions of resilient landscapes More Information Actions
The Joint Fire Science Program (JFSP) is interested in sponsoring projects that explore and better define the concept of resilient landscapes, especially considering changing climates. Proposals can include a wide variety of approaches to stimulate new and creative thinking regarding the concept, definition, management, and measurement of resilient landscapes. Investigators are encouraged to work in collaborative cross-disciplinary teams, including both ecological and social scientists. Resilience is prominently featured in the Cohesive Strategy as one of three primary goals: " Restore and maintain landscapes: Landscapes across all jurisdictions are resilient to fire-related disturbances in accordance with management objectives. And two of the Cohesive Strategy guiding principles directly relate to ecological resilience: " Actively manage the land to make it more resilient to disturbance, in accordance with management objectives. " Wildland fire, as an essential ecological process and natural change agent, may be incorporated into the planning process and wildfire response. Investigators are encouraged to consider these objectives and principles in study design. The goal of this proposal solicitation is to stimulate innovative thinking and generate new ideas and concepts that could help fire, fuels, and resource managers better understand how to develop measureable objectives leading to more resilient landscapes. The types of activities appropriate to this task statement are broad, and could include: " Articulation of new concepts and related measurement criteria " A synthesis of existing knowledge and concepts leading to new, testable hypotheses " Development of an experimental design to test a new hypothesis " A modeling exercise to test a theoretical advance in an operational context " Development of a research plan to guide future research and new knowledge " Demonstration of the application of resilience concepts across broad landscapes Proposals should directly involve fire and fuels managers in the proposed research, and demonstrate how the proposed activities will advance innovative thinking that enhances fire, fuels and resource managers abilities to achieve more resilient landscapes. No more than one proposal responding to this task statement will be accepted from any scientist, either as a Principal Investigator or as a Co-Principal Investigator. JFSP does not make any commitment to fund future projects that test ideas or build on work generated from this task statement. View FOA

Closed on Nov 13, 2015

16-4-01 FASMEE - Fuels and consumption More Information Actions
The Joint Fire Science Program (JFSP) seeks proposals to select a Discipline Lead to guide the fuels and consumption discipline for the FASMEE project. The Principal Investigator from one selected proposal will participate as Discipline Lead for fuels and consumption in the FASMEE Scientific Leadership Team. Principal responsibilities include final responsibility for the fuels and consumption portion of the Phase 2 observational study plan, interim deliverables, and the participation in all project meetings and conference calls. The fuels and consumption Discipline Lead will need to closely collaborate with other Discipline and Modeling Leads to plan measurements. Additionally, the fuel and consumption Discipline Lead is expected to provide information needed to allow later potential follow-on fire effect studies. Responsive proposals should include a conceptual observational study design that covers the needs outlined below and in Section 2.1 of Appendix A (FASMEE Observational Specifications). Proposed study designs should layout the overall sampling approach to be used, including placement and types of measurements and their spatial and temporal extent and resolutions split out by measurement platform (e.g. ground sampling, tower-based measurements, aircraft-based measurements). Proposed study designs do not need to list exact instrumentation, but are encouraged to include as much detail as needed to describe the intent and effect of the measurements listed. For fuels and consumption, proposed study designs should include an initial comprehensive plan for the collection of gridded, three-dimensional pre-fire and post-fire characterization of all fuels that have the potential to consume (e.g., tree canopies, shrubs, herbs, downed wood, litter and duff) at spatial scales relevant to fires and models to be evaluated. Multi-scaled characterizations are expected with coordination between ground-based and remotely sensed imagery. Proposed study designs for this discipline must include: A. Gridded fuel mapping and properties of pre-fire and post fire of all fuels occurring on the research site that have the potential to burn. B. Coordinated ground-based sampling and remotely sensed datasets to provide spatial mapping of pre- and post-fire loads, gaps, fuel moisture and fuel consumption at temporal and spatial scales relevant to the models being evaluated. C. Characterization of live and dead fuel properties (i.e., bulk density, surface area to volume ratios, packing ratio, specific heat and fuel moisture content) by particle size class along with modeling strategies to assign subsample fuel properties to gridded fuels. D. Fuel consumption by combustion phase and duration by fuel bed component. In addition to the proposed study design, proposals should include a discussion of how the proposed study design can be beneficial for model validation, evaluation, and development. Discussions are encouraged to be specific about the models benefiting from the proposed observations. Other research questions that proposals are encouraged to address include: " How can FASMEE contribute to creation of a system for describing fuels and vegetation that can scale across the wide range of spatial scales needed for decision support (from fine scales to 30-m+ aggregate fuels)? " How can FASMEE support development of new protocols that can better capture both the aggregate information and sub-grid variability needed by the next-generation of fire behavior and fire effects models? " How can FASMEE advance the ability of remote sensing to be used to cheaply create stand and forest scale fuels and vegetation maps for land management? " How can FASMEE advance the ability to predict unburned areas within larger fires? Additional research questions may be identified and addressed, but these must be justified in the proposal. Respondents should be aware of the responsibilities, timelines, deliverables, and travel requirements listed in Sections 3 and 5 and budget accordingly. View FOA

Closed on Nov 13, 2015

16-4-02 FASMEE - Fire behavior and energy More Information Actions
The Joint Fire Science Program (JFSP) seeks proposals to select a Discipline Lead to guide the fire behavior and energy discipline for the FASMEE project. The Principal Investigator from one selected proposal will participate as Discipline Lead for fire behavior and energy in the FASMEE Scientific Leadership Team. Principal responsibilities include final responsibility for the fire behavior and energy portion of the Phase 2 observational study plan, interim deliverables, and the participation in all project meetings and conference calls. The fire behavior and energy Discipline Lead will need to closely collaborate with other Discipline and Modeling Leads to plan measurements. Additionally, the fire behavior and energy Discipline Lead is expected to provide information needed to allow later potential follow-on fire effect studies. Responsive proposals should include a conceptual observational study design that covers the needs outlined below and in Section 2.2 of Appendix A (FASMEE Observational Specifications). Proposed study designs should layout the overall sampling approach to be used, including placement and types of measurements and their spatial and temporal extent and resolutions split out by measurement platform (e.g. ground sampling, tower-based measurements, aircraft-based measurements). Proposed study designs do not need to list exact instrumentation, but are encouraged to include as much detail as needed to describe the intent and effect of the measurements listed. For fire behavior and energy, proposed study designs should include an initial comprehensive plan for the collection of fire behavior information designed to validate and improve fire behavior modeling at scales relevant for operational fire support. Proposed study designs should also include: A. Full field coverage of fire progression, including flame dimensions and patterns within the flame zone. B. Fire depth and spatial evolution over the fire event. C. Measurement of the spatial and temporal evolution of heat flux. D. Detailed coverage of fine scale processes in specific areas. E. Measurements to provide closure of the fire energy budget at least in specific locations. F. Measurement of pre-frontal heating of fuels via convection, radiation, and ember transport. G. A description of the needed spatial and temporal resolution of all measurements. H. Discussion of how these measurements may be important for model development and validation. In addition to the proposed study design, proposals should include a discussion of how the proposed study design can be used for model validation, evaluation, and development. Discussions are encouraged to be specific about the models benefiting from the proposed observations. Other research questions that proposals are encouraged to address include: " How can FASMEE work with the Tactical Fire Remote Sensing Advisory Committee (TFRSAC) and the operational remote sensing community to advance sensing and calibration of remotely sensed fire detections, fire radiative energy, and burn scars? " How can FASMEE work to bridge the scale difference between fine-scale laboratory experiments designed to advance fire behavior theory and coarse scale operational models? " How can FASMEE work to advance methods and procedures for operational modeling where fine scale fuel measurements (such as those to be collected for FASMEE) are not available? " How can FASMEE advance methods for measuring the amount and pattern of heat flux? " How can FASMEE advance methods for measuring convective heat flux? Additional research questions may be identified and addressed, but these must be justified in the proposal. Respondents should be aware of the responsibilities, timelines, deliverables, and travel requirements listed in Sections 3 and 5 and budget accordingly. View FOA

Closed on Nov 13, 2015

16-4-03 FASMEE - Plume development and meteorology More Information Actions
The Joint Fire Science Program (JFSP) seeks proposals to select a Discipline Lead to guide the plume development and meteorology discipline for the FASMEE project. The Principal Investigator from one selected proposal will participate as Discipline Lead for plume development and meteorology in the FASMEE Scientific Leadership Team. Principal responsibilities include final responsibility for the plume development and meteorology portion of the Phase 2 observational study plan, interim deliverables, and the participation in all project meetings and conference calls. The plume development and meteorology Discipline Lead will need to closely collaborate with other Discipline and Modeling Leads to plan measurements. Responsive proposals should include a conceptual observational study design that covers the needs outlined below and in Section 2.3 of Appendix A (FASMEE Observational Specifications). Proposed study designs should layout the overall sampling approach to be used, including placement and types of measurements and their spatial and temporal extent and resolutions split out by measurement platform (e.g. ground sampling, tower-based measurements, aircraft-based measurements). Proposed study designs do not need to list exact instrumentation, but are encouraged to include as much detail as needed to describe the intent and effect of the measurements listed. For plume development and meteorology, proposed study designs should include an initial comprehensive plan for the collection of plume development and meteorology information designed to validate and improve coupled fire-atmosphere and plume development models at scales relevant to both operational fire behavior modeling and smoke modeling. Proposed study designs should also include: A. Measurements of the state variables and their evolution within the plume. B. The specific ambient weather conditions to be measured including: i. Surface and upper level parameters; and ii. Pre-burn and day of burn parameters. C. A framework for measuring advective (vertical and horizontal) and radiative heat fluxes over the duration of the fire events. D. Discussion of methods used to quantify turbulence. E. Estimates of plume dimensions over time, including from simple techniques that can potentially be widely applied. In addition to the proposed study design, proposals should include a discussion of how the proposed study design can be beneficial for model validation, evaluation, and development. Discussions are encouraged to be specific about the types of models benefiting from the proposed observations. Other questions that proposals are encouraged to address include: " How can FASMEE advance the underlying conceptual models of wildland fire plumes? " How can FASMEE advance a new generation of improved plume models usable for operational smoke prediction modeling? " How can FASMEE advance the operational coupling of coupled fire-atmosphere models with smoke models to improve smoke predictions? " How can FASMEE advance the ability to correctly allocate smoke emissions between lofted emissions and non-lofted emissions? " How can FASMEE help close the overall fire energy balance budget? " How can FASMEE help develop simple and inexpensive protocols for measuring plumes that can be deployed widely? Additional research questions may be identified and addressed, but these must be justified in the proposal. Respondents should be aware of the responsibilities, timelines, deliverables, and travel requirements listed in Sections 3 and 5 and budget accordingly. View FOA

Closed on Nov 13, 2015

16-4-04 FASMEE - Smoke emissions, chemistry, and transport More Information Actions
The Joint Fire Science Program (JFSP) seeks proposals to select a Discipline Lead to guide the smoke emissions, chemistry, and transport discipline for the FASMEE project. The Principal Investigator from one selected proposal will participate as Discipline Lead for smoke emissions, chemistry, and transport in the FASMEE Scientific Leadership Team. Principal responsibilities include final responsibility for the smoke emissions, chemistry, and transport portion of the Phase 2 observational study plan, interim deliverables, and the participation in all project meetings and conference calls. The smoke emissions, chemistry, and transport Discipline Lead will need to closely collaborate with other Discipline and Modeling Leads to plan measurements. Responsive proposals should include a conceptual observational study design that covers the needs outlined below and in Section 2.4 of Appendix A (FASMEE Observational Specifications). Proposed study designs should layout the overall sampling approach to be used, including placement and types of measurements and their spatial and temporal extent and resolutions split out by measurement platform (e.g. ground sampling, tower-based measurements, aircraft-based measurements). Proposed study designs do not need to list exact instrumentation, but are encouraged to include as much detail as needed to describe the intent and effect of the measurements listed. For smoke emissions, chemistry, and transport, proposed study designs should include an initial comprehensive plan for the collection of smoke emissions, chemistry, and transport information designed to validate and improve smoke modeling at scales relevant to operational smoke prediction. Proposed study designs should also include: A. The characterization of smoke emissions at or near the source (include non-lofted smoke emissions). B. Measurements and methodology needed for smoke plume evolution for evaluation of smoke plume and dispersion modeling. C. Relationship among within plume concentration profiles and meteorological variables. D. Physical and chemical evolution of smoke throughout the lofting plume. E. Description of needed vertical and horizontal profile transects starting at the fire source and extending down-wind. F. Characterization of smoke impacts such as: i. Non-lofted smoke in nearby drainages; ii. Nighttime smoke settling; and iii. Downwind surface concentrations. In addition to the proposed study design, proposals should include a discussion of how the proposed study design can benefit model validation, evaluation, and development. Discussions are encouraged to be specific about the models benefiting from the proposed observations. Other research questions that proposals are encouraged to address include: " How can FASMEE advance the estimation of emissions and lofting smoke from satellite products? " How can FASMEE advance the modeling of nighttime detrainment of smoke in valleys and advance the understanding of smoke drainage flows and pooling? " How can FASMEE advance our ability to correctly allocate lofted and non-loft smoke emissions? " How can FASMEE be used in conjunction with laboratory experiments to better characterize smoke emissions by phase from various fuelbed types? " How do emissions components and ratios vary over the lifetime of a fire and across fire scales? " How can FASMEE improve the estimation of uncertainties in emission production models? " How can FASMEE help inform the sensitivities and uncertainties in operational models of PM2.5? " How can FASMEE develop information useful for air resource advisors, air regulators, and public health officials in creating better health advisories for both firefighters and the public? Additional research questions may be identified and addressed, but these must be justified in the proposal. Respondents should be aware of the responsibilities, timelines, deliverables, and travel requirements listed in Sections 3 and 5 and budget accordingly. View FOA

Closed on Nov 13, 2015

16-4-05 FASMEE - Modeling leads More Information Actions
The Joint Fire Science Program (JFSP) seeks proposals to select FASMEE Modeling Leads for specific models listed below. Principal Investigators from selected proposals will participate as Discipline Leads for various models in the FASMEE Scientific Leadership Team. Principal responsibilities include pre-burn simulations to evaluate the Phase 2 observational study plan, other interim deliverables, and the participation in all project meetings and conference calls. Modeling Leads will need to closely collaborate with Discipline Leads to develop a validated observational study plan. FASMEE will use the results of pre-burn simulations to help select burn locations and ignition methodologies, and to help refine the observational plan in order to ensure that the data collected will be of value in validating specific models. A wide range of model simulations will be performed by the existing FASMEE project team as part of Phase 1 including fire behavior modeling, fuel consumption and emissions modeling, and smoke dispersion modeling. Modeling Leads will: " Provide modeling expertise; " Do pre-burn simulations for their identified models; and " Work with the observational Discipline Leads and FASMEE Project Leads to vet the draft and final study plans. Responsive proposals need to identify one or more of the following models that will be covered by their proposal (listed alphabetically): A. DAYSMOKE plume model B. FIRETEC coupled fire-atmosphere model C. WFDS coupled fire-atmosphere model D. WRFFIRE coupled fire-atmosphere model E. WRF-CHEM (preferentially WRF-FIRE-CHEM) coupled photochemical model Note that model simulations using other relevant models will be executed by the Phase 1 Project Leads. Modeling Leads selected through this FON will also need to coordinate with these model results to fully meet Phase I planning needs. Respondents are asked to detail their modeling system(s), and to examine the applicability of their modeling system(s) to two hypothetical burn sites as described in the template. (Note: these are not the specific FASMEE burn sites, but are selected to be representative of potential burn types/sites.) Specific questions to be addressed in the proposal are: " What are the key issues facing these types of models? " How can the observational campaign proposed by FASMEE address these issues? " What kind of burn sites, fire types, and fire conditions would work best for collecting data to address these issues? " How can the pre-burn simulations be used to improve the observational design and specifications for FASMEE? Respondents should be aware of the responsibilities, timelines, deliverables, and travel requirements listed in Sections 4 and 5 and budget accordingly. View FOA

Closed on Nov 13, 2015