Funding Announcements

Open Funding Opportunity Announcements (FOAs)

20-1-01 Graduate Research Innovation (GRIN) Award More Information Actions
Specific objectives related to management are to enhance student exposure to and interaction with fire and fuels managers, develop appreciation and understanding of fire and fuels managers information and research needs, and augment already planned and funded master or doctoral research to develop information and/or products useful to managers. The JFSP also is interested in understanding the science needs of decision-makers, which provides an opportunity for students to enhance their understanding of how science can be used to inform fire-related policy. As a result, these awards are intended to enable graduate students to conduct research that will supplement and enhance the quality, scope, or applicability of their thesis or dissertation to develop information and products useful to managers and decision-makers. Proposals must demonstrate relevance to fire, fuels, or resource management and include means to directly communicate with managers, when applicable, regarding project outcomes. Proposals must be directly related to the mission and goals of JFSP to be considered. Applicants are encouraged to search the JFSP website (www.firescience.gov) to learn more about the scope of JFSP activities. In addition, proposals must directly address management- or policy-related questions related to one or more of the following topic areas: " Fuels management and fire behavior " Changing fire environment " Emissions and air quality " Fire effects and post-fire recovery " Relative impacts of prescribed fire versus wildfire " Human dimensions of fire

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Proposal Body

Proposal Overview

Literature Cited

Certification by Advisor

Budget Spreadsheet

Budget Narrative

Data Management Plan

Advisor Letter

CV

Support Letters

List of Acronyms

Closes on Dec 05, 2019

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20-2-01 Performance of fuel breaks and fuel break systems More Information Actions
The objectives of this task statement are to: (1) identify or develop metrics (standards) to assess fuel break and fuel break system performance in terms of controlling wildfire behavior, aiding in wildfire suppression operations, and minimizing wildfire risk and impacts to valued resources (2) evaluate fuel breaks and fuel break systems using these metrics, and (3) identify necessary improvements in the implementation of operational fire behavior models and their data input requirements relative to assessing fuel break and fuel break system performance. Proposers must address both research needs 1 and 2 below to be considered responsive to this task statement. Research need 3 is optional. Research proposals are sought that identify or develop metrics to assess fuel break and fuel break system performance, evaluate fuel break and fuel break systems using these metrics, and investigate the applicability of these metrics to operational fire behavior models for a variety of regions and vegetation types. Proposals should clearly distinguish, as applicable, the different management objectives that influence fuel break versus fuel break system design and how this may affect the selection of appropriate performance metrics for fuel breaks versus fuel break systems. When addressing the performance of fuel break systems (as opposed to individual fuel break performance) at landscape and regional scales, proposals may consider metrics that account for both the positive and negative aspects of system performance (e.g., impacts to plant and animal communities, ecosystem resilience). Research proposals should consider fire environment factors such as fuel moisture, wind, and relative humidity under which fuel breaks with different characteristics (bare ground, vegetative) perform as intended (versus under extreme weather conditions). Research proposals also should consider using a combination of both empirical and modeling approaches to evaluate, calibrate, or validate their findings. Specific research needs include: 1. Identify or develop quantitative and qualitative metrics (standards) to assess fuel break and fuel break system performance. Metrics should be based on end-user needs (management objectives) and enable quantifying how fuel breaks and fuel break systems affect short- and long-term risk from wildfire to firefighters, human communities, and cultural and natural resources. In addition, proposed metrics also should enable distinguishing the costs versus benefits of fuel break systems to valued resources. 2. Using identified or developed metrics, evaluate performance of existing or planned fuel breaks and fuel break systems, with respect to fire behavior, operational response, wildfire risk, and threats to valued resources, and identify factors (e.g., burning condition, treatment type, area treated) that influence fuel break and fuel break system performance. 3. Identify necessary improvements in the implementation of operational fire behavior models, modeling processes, and data input requirements (e.g., fuel models) through model calibration, evaluation, and validation that incorporate the standards above and support overall improvement in model output interpretation as a means to assess fuel break and fuel break system performance.

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Proposal Overview

Proposal Body

Literature Cited

Budget Spreadsheet

Budget Narrative

Science Delivery

Data Management Plan

CV

Support Letters

List of Acronyms

Closes on Dec 05, 2019

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20-3-01 Regional Science Exchange and Outreach More Information Actions
The objective of this task statement is to solicit proposals to lead and execute a particular regional fire science exchange for a period of two years. The JFSP funds and provides oversight to a national collaborative of 15 regional wildland fire science exchanges: the Fire Science Exchange Network (FSEN). The FSEN provides the most relevant, current wildland fire science information to federal, state, local, tribal, and private stakeholders within ecologically similar regions. The FSEN brings fire, fuel, natural resource, and land managers, practitioners, and scientists together to address regional wildland fire management needs and challenges. Please see the JFSP website (www.firescience.gov) for additional information about the FSEN. This solicitation is seeking individual proposals (i.e., each proposal must be specific to one region) for the following four regions of the FSEN: Alaska, California, Great Basin, and Pacific Islands.

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Proposal Overview

Planned activities/outputs/outcomes

Literature Cited

Budget Spreadsheet

CV

Support Letters

List of Acronyms

Budget Narrative

Proposal Body

Closes on Dec 05, 2019

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14-1-01 Fuels treatment effectiveness across landscapes More Information Actions
The Joint Fire Science Program (JFSP) is soliciting proposals for research that evaluates the effectiveness of fuels treatments across landscapes (>10,000 acres). Studies are needed to determine whether the type and configuration of fuels treatments across landscapes can affect intensity, rate of spread, and patterns of severity for subsequent wildfires, or enable more effective wildfire response. View FOA

Closed on Dec 11, 2013

14-1-02 Influence of past wildfires on wildfire behavior, effects and management More Information Actions
The Joint Fire Science Program (JFSP) is soliciting proposals for research that evaluates the influence of past wildfires on subsequent wildfire behavior, effects, and management, including suppression strategies, tactics and costs. View FOA

Closed on Dec 11, 2013

14-1-03 Contribution of smoke emissions to secondary organic aerosols More Information Actions
The Joint Fire Science Program (JFSP) is soliciting proposals for research that develops new science and knowledge to support improvement of wildland fire smoke emissions factors for secondary organic aerosols (SOAs). Hydrocarbon emissions that chemically transform within the atmosphere to form secondary organic aerosols are now thought to be a significant component of total PM2.5. New science is needed to better understand the role and significance of wildland fire in formation of SOAs. View FOA

Closed on Dec 11, 2013

14-1-04 Effects of smoke from wildland fires on human health in urban centers More Information Actions
The Joint Fire Science Program (JFSP) is soliciting proposals for research that assesses the impact of wildland fire smoke on human health in urban centers in the United States. The Action Plans from each of the National Cohesive Wildland Fire Management Strategy (http://www.forestsandrangelands.gov/strategy) regions have identified the need for coordinated science focused on smoke management. Research topics of interest include the extent of past observed adverse health effects using selected case studies, and wildland fire smoke concentration and exposure duration thresholds associated with public health concerns. Proposals should assess a limited number of case studies of historical wildland fire smoke episodes in locations where there is likely to be a recurring need for actions to manage smoke-related public health risk. Case studies may include international cities if they offer lessons of relevance to the United States View FOA

Closed on Dec 11, 2013

14-1-05 Compatibility of fire and fuel treatments with threatened and endangered bats More Information Actions
The Joint Fire Science Program (JFSP) is soliciting proposals for research that investigates the compatibility of fire and fuels management activities with habitat and population restoration of federally listed or candidate threatened and endangered (T&E) bat species. Wildland fire managers require up-to-date and high quality science that defines the effects of fuel treatment and wildfire on wildlife habitat in order to effectively establish and maintain resilient landscapes, enhance human communities, and to respond to wildfire. Bats provide important ecosystem services, such as insect and pest predation, pollination, and seed dispersal. Bat species also frequently occur in fire-adapted ecosystems where fuels management and wildfire response activities are designed to maintain and restore resilient landscapes. Thus, we are interested in these activities and how they may also compliment T&E Species habitat conservation and recovery plan objectives. View FOA

Closed on Dec 11, 2013

14-1-06 Effects of wildfire on water More Information Actions
The Joint Fire Science Program (JFSP) is soliciting proposals for research that evaluates the effects of wildfire on the quantity, quality, and treatability of drinking water supplies, and their recovery over time. High-quality water is a critical ecosystem service furnished by watersheds to communities across the United States. View FOA

Closed on Dec 11, 2013

14-1-07 Fire weather data resolution More Information Actions
Weather data are critical inputs for many important fire management applications, e.g., assessments of fire danger, fire behavior, and smoke dispersion. Scientists and managers alike often assume that increased resolution of fire weather variables leads to increased accuracy of model outputs, thus leading to improved management decisions and outcomes. Increased resolution of weather data comes at a cost, however, and budgetary resources are increasingly scarce. The assumption apparently underlying the argument that higher resolution weather data are needed is that fire and fuel managers hedge against uncertainty by taking less risk. Therefore, higher resolution data reduces uncertainty, thereby opening a wider window for fire and fuels operations at the same levels of risk. In essence, if more reliable model predictions were available, managers would have more flexibility and options. The Joint Fire Science Program (JFSP) is interested in proposals that critically examine this assumption in an operational context. JFSP seeks proposals that examine the sensitivity of modeled results to the resolution of weather variables, and evaluate the importance of modeled results using weather data for fire and fuels management decision-making. View FOA

Closed on Dec 11, 2013

14-2-01 New Science Initiative Social Science More Information Actions
The Joint Fire Science Program (JFSP) is interested in sponsoring new research that leads to or advances innovative ideas in two areas of fire social sciences: fire-adapted communities and risk perception. The goal is to push the frontiers of knowledge and understanding and to generate new ideas and concepts. The types of activities appropriate to this task statement are broad, and could include: " Articulation of new concepts or frameworks " A synthesis of information to generate new hypotheses " Scenario analysis " Field activities involving diverse scientists, policy-makers, managers, and citizens " Development of an experimental design to test an innovative hypothesis Proposals should demonstrate how the proposed activities will advance innovative thinking. Proposals must address questions relevant to either of two general themes: fire-adapted communities or risk perception. The following questions are illustrative examples. Investigators are not required to address these specific questions. Fire-adapted communities " What do local leaders and organizers need to know about their communities, fire environment, and risk mitigation in order to build adaptive capacity and encourage adaptation to wildfire? " How do social processes and networks affect community readiness for wildfire? How can we assess adaptive capacity in ways that account for local social processes and networks? " How can wildfire experts and other emergency managers work together so that adaptation for one hazard enhances adaptation for other hazards? " What incentives are most effective in support of fire-adapted communities? Risk perception " What factors influence how risk is perceived by decision-makers and communities, and how does that perception change based on information uncertainty, the immediacy of the risk, or other relevant factors? " How can differences in risk exposure best be communicated to decision-makers and stakeholders? How can understanding of these differences be improved? " How can the spatial and temporal trade-offs in risk best be communicated? What factors influence how stakeholder and public groups perceive these risk trade-offs? " How do risk perceptions vary across public, agency, and cultural groups? View FOA

Closed on Dec 11, 2013

14-3-01 Graduate Research Innovation (GRIN) Award More Information Actions
In partnership with the Association for Fire Ecology, the Joint Fire Science Program (JFSP) invites current M.S. and Ph.D. graduate students enrolled in U.S. colleges or universities in the fields of wildland fire and related human dimensions and ecological sciences to apply for a Graduate Research Innovation (GRIN) award. The purpose of the GRIN awards is to: " Enhance graduate students exposure to and interaction with fire and fuels managers " Develop understanding of fire and fuels managers information and research needs " Augment ongoing research to develop information and/or products useful to managers JFSP recognizes that graduate students of today are the managers, scientists, and leaders of tomorrow. These awards allow graduate students to conduct research that will supplement and enhance the quality, scope, or applicability of their thesis or dissertation, and to build skills needed for independent inquiry. Proposals must describe new, unfunded work that extends ongoing or planned research that is the subject of a thesis or dissertation that has been approved by the graduate students advisory committee. View FOA

Closed on Dec 11, 2013

14-4-01 Knowledge Exchange Consortia Pre-proposals More Information Actions
The Joint Fire Science Program (JFSP) is soliciting pre-proposals to support two new consortia of fire science providers and managers to enhance the exchange and adoption of fire science. New consortia will be added to an existing national network of 14 regional consortia, established by JFSP in two phases over the last four years. See the JFSP website or contact the JFSP Program Office (http://www.firescience.gov/JFSP_consortia.cfm) for more information about the knowledge exchange network. Pre-proposals will support initial planning and assessment of management needs for two regions not currently part of this network: 1. Northeast and mid-Atlantic regions 2. Washington, D.C Note that the Washington DC consortium will be different from other consortia because of a focus on the policy-making community rather than field practitioners. For that reason, stakeholders exist across much of the United States and are already served to some degree by the existing national knowledge exchange network. Pre-proposals for a Washington, D.C. centered consortium should consider how this broader set of stakeholders could be supported, including linkages with the existing regional consortia. View FOA

Closed on Dec 11, 2013

14-5-01 Fuels Treatment Effectiveness: Landscape-level and Programmatic Economics More Information Actions
The Joint Fire Science Program (JFSP) is soliciting proposals that assess the cost effectiveness of fuel treatments at multiple scales, as well as a strategy for maintaining previous fuel treatment investments in priority areas. View FOA

Closed on Jun 13, 2014