Funding Announcements

Open Funding Opportunity Notices (FONs)

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17-1-01 Landscape fuel treatment strategies and wildfire management More Information Actions
The objective of this task statement is to inform planning and implementation of landscape fuel treatment strategies that allow for safe and effective management of wildfire to meet protection and resource management objectives. Projects funded under this task statement are intended to support the vision of the 2014 National Cohesive Wildfire Management Strategy, in particular progressing towards resilient landscapes. Research Needs: Research proposals are sought that evaluate the effectiveness of landscape fuel treatment strategies with a focus on the interaction between landscape fuel treatment strategies and subsequent wildfire management actions as they relate to the ability to implement safe, effective, and efficient wildfire management decisions. Specific research needs include: 1. Identify the characteristics of landscape fuel treatment strategies (e.g., distribution/saturation of treatments, type, age, location) that allow for effective and safe use by firefighters to manage wildfire for resource management objectives and asset protection. 2. Evaluate how the effectiveness of landscape fuel treatment strategies is constrained by different social (e.g., proximity to human communities, degree to which managers consider resource management objectives), ecological (e.g., vegetation type, fire regime), or other factors. 3. Develop metrics that are scientifically defensible and measureable for evaluating the effectiveness of landscape fuel treatment strategies in terms of allowing for safe and effective use by firefighters to manage wildfire for resource management objectives and asset protection. For proposals to be considered responsive to this task statement, proposals must address the first two research needs above. It is expected that these research needs will be addressed through retrospective analyses, modeling, or other feasible approach. Proposals that address the third research need as well are desirable but not required. Research needs under this task statement do not include an evaluation of the direct effect of landscape fuel treatments on resources.

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List of Acronyms

Support Letters

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Data Management Plan

Science Delivery

Literature Cited

Budget Narrative

Budget Spreadsheet

Closes on Nov 17, 2016

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17-1-02 Effects of changing wildfire management strategies More Information Actions
Objective: The objective of this task statement is to assess the degree to which wildfire management strategies have changed since the issuance of the 2009 Guidance for Implementation of the Federal Fire Policy and the effectiveness of such changes. Research Needs: The Joint Fire Science Program (JFSP) is interested in proposals that using retrospective analyses, perhaps combined with modeling exercises, evaluate changing wildfire management strategies and the effectiveness of these strategies in meeting resource management objectives. Research needs include: 1. Quantify the extent to which wildfire response strategies and tactics have changed since issuance of the 2009 wildfire policy guidance and identify any barriers that have hampered these changes. 2. Describe the degree to which changing wildfire response strategies and tactics have had a beneficial or adverse impact on highly valued resources (e.g., human communities, air quality, wildlife habitat) or changed the risk of future wildfire to such resources. 3. Identify how the range of burning conditions (e.g., weather, fuels) affects the effectiveness of wildfire and wildfire management activities to meet specific objectives for managing fuels and vegetation. Proposers must address all three research needs above. The JFSP is particularly interested in studies that examine how responses to these questions differ by region, agency, vegetation type, or other significant factor. The JFSP expects that information on changing wildfire strategies can be inferred from an analysis of incident reports, interviews with incident commanders, or both.

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Proposal Body

List of Acronyms

Support Letters

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Data Management Plan

Science Delivery

Budget Narrative

Budget Spreadsheet

Literature Cited

Closes on Nov 17, 2016

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17-1-03 Post-fire recovery More Information Actions
Objective: The objective of this task statement is to advance our fundamental and applied understanding of post-fire recovery and associated management responses in ecosystems for which altered fire regimes may shape post-fire recovery trajectory(ies); in particular, for those ecosystems that span the range of the greater sage-grouse (Centrocercus urophasianus). Research Needs: For each ecosystem proposed for study, specific research needs include: 1. Relationships (i.e., interactions with and implications for) between (a) pre-fire (e.g., existing native and non-native invasive vegetation) and immediately post-fire conditions (e.g., burn severity, amount of downed woody materials), (b) standard, immediate post-fire stabilization approaches (e.g., herbicide applications, seeding, erosion control) that respond to those particular conditions, and (c) long-term (i.e., three years and beyond) recovery actions. 2. How the phasing of recovery actions in general (i.e., not just related to immediate stabilization actions) either facilitate or adversely affect long-term recovery in the context of meeting management objectives, including desired ecosystem services. 3. Role of soil ecological processes and community structure and composition in facilitating or preventing invasion by non-native species that alter fire behavior. 4. Relative effectiveness of different soil and vegetation treatments (e.g., for woody plant species this could be different seeding or seedling establishment approaches at different spatial scales) in facilitating recovery. 5. Spatially and temporally explicit, robust (i.e., scientifically defensible), and easily measured metrics of recovery that account for the phases of recovery as well as desired outcomes. For proposals to be considered responsive to this task statement, proposals must address at least both research needs 1 and 2. In addition, proposers have the option to address one or more of research needs 3 through 5. The JFSP is particularly interested in proposals that address ecosystems that span the range of the greater sage-grouse. For each ecosystem proposed for study, proposals also must include a conceptual model of ecosystem function in the context of fire that is used to (1) convey the state of our scientific understanding and management practice, (2) identify key remaining knowledge gaps, and (3) provide a basis for proposed hypotheses, questions, and experimental design. As context for proposed work, proposals should describe the degree to which environmental and other factors (e.g., presence of invasive species that alter fire behavior) have changed from historic conditions that affect fire as an ecological process and how these changes affect post-fire recovery for the ecosystem(s) they propose to study.

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Proposal Body

Literature Cited

Budget Spreadsheet

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Data Management Plan

CV

Support Letters

List of Acronyms

Closes on Nov 17, 2016

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17-1-04 Fire effects on herbaceous and shrub species More Information Actions
Objective: The objective of this task statement is to develop empirical and mechanistic data and information on the effects of fire on meristematic tissue and seeds of herbaceous plant and shrub species that may ultimately be used in the development or validation of fire effects models that predict herbaceous plant and shrub response to fire. Research Needs: The Joint Fire Science Program (JFSP) is interested in proposals that through laboratory and field experiments further our understanding of the direct effects of heat from fire on a variety of herbaceous and shrub species under different environmental conditions and across different geographic areas. Research needs include: 1. Quantify the effect of heat from fire on the ability of a variety of herbaceous and shrub species to resprout from meristematic tissue (e.g., buds, meristems) under different environmental conditions. 2. Quantify the effect of heat from fire on germination of seeds from a variety of herbaceous and shrub species under different environmental conditions. 3. Quantify additional germination requirements (e.g., bare mineral soil, soil moisture) of seeds from a variety of herbaceous plant and shrub species following fire. For proposals to be considered responsive to this task statement, proposals must address either research need 1 or 2 listed above. So that resulting data are broadly applicable, JFSP is particularly interested in proposals that address the research needs associated with multiple species. It is JFSPs desire that developed datasets ultimately can be used in development or validation of fire effects prediction models. Proposals that include model development or validation are desirable, but not required.

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Proposal Body

Literature Cited

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CV

Support Letters

List of Acronyms

Closes on Nov 17, 2016

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17-1-05 Validating mesoscale, atmospheric boundary prediction models and tools More Information Actions
Objective: The operational fire weather community requires validation of numerical weather models and predictive tools as a means of raising situational awareness. The Joint Fire Science Program is interested in research proposals that address this need within a risk management context with the goal of enhancing firefighter safety. Research Needs: Research proposals are sought that address the validation requirements of existing numerical weather models and predictive tools with regard to predicting mesoscale atmospheric boundaries. Specific research needs include: 1. Demonstrate the ability to characterize the development, movement, and magnitude of mesoscale atmospheric boundaries through validation of existing numerical weather models and predictive tools using relevant observational data. 2. Demonstrate forecast skill of thunderstorm outflows, gust fronts, and downdraft winds near fires through validation of the above models and tools. 3. Demonstrate that validation of the above models and tools can be accomplished in complex terrain situations. 4. Communicate model and tool outputs (predictions) within a risk management context that is meaningful to the operational fire weather community and firefighters. For proposals to be considered responsive to this task statement, proposals must address all four research needs. Proposals to develop new or enhance existing models are outside the scope of this topic; however, improvements in model structure that occur incidental to model validation are acceptable.

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Proposal Body

Literature Cited

Budget Spreadsheet

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Data Management Plan

CV

Support Letters

List of Acronyms

Closes on Nov 17, 2016

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17-1-06 Factors that affect the co-management of wildland fire risk More Information Actions
Objective - The objective of this task statement is to advance our fundamental and applied understanding of the human dimensions that affect the co-management(1) of wildland fire risk. Risk in this context may involve uncertainties and differences in stakeholder(2) values that preclude a strictly probabilistic approach to risk management in its traditional sense. Research Needs - Specific research needs include: 1. Assess the social factors that lead to successful or unsuccessful co-management of wildland fire risk across administrative and ownership boundaries and whether they differ by ecosystem, region, or culture. 2. Evaluate how stakeholder views (whether within or across organizations) on accountability for wildland fire, response option implementation affect potential outcomes, in which the perception of accountability can span the spectrum from a legally mandated jurisdictional role to a willingness to engage in cooperative approaches among stakeholders. 3. Determine the role of different models of co-production of knowledge in facilitating stakeholder consensus on the underlying science, values, and accountability for response option implementation that shape risk management decisions. 4. Characterize the uncertainties involved and identify the decision frameworks that can best address them. -- For proposals to be considered responsive to this task statement, proposals must address two or more of the above research needs. Case study approaches are encouraged, but other approaches will be considered if appropriately justified. _________________ (1) Wildland fire frequently impacts landscapes that cross ownership and management boundaries. Co-management occurs between government entities with jurisdictional responsibility for fire incident management and response and other stakeholders who may not have jurisdictional responsibility, but do have management interests impacted by the fire incident. For the purpose of this task statement, co-management refers to the interactions and decisions of these management interests. (2) For the purposes of this task statement, stakeholder includes government entities and private entities whose risk management decisions in regards to fire may impact a broader landscape beyond their own individual interests.

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Proposal Body

Literature Cited

Budget Spreadsheet

Budget Narrative

Science Delivery

Data Management Plan

CV

Support Letters

List of Acronyms

Closes on Nov 17, 2016

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17-2-01 Graduate Research Innovation (GRIN) Award More Information Actions
In partnership with the Association for Fire Ecology, the Joint Fire Science Program (JFSP) invites current master and doctoral students enrolled in US colleges or universities in the fields of wildland fire and related human dimensions, ecological, and atmospheric sciences to apply for a Graduate Research Innovation (GRIN) award. The purpose of a GRIN award is to enhance student exposure to the management and policy relevance of their research to achieve beneficial outcomes of funded work. The JFSP also is interested in understanding the science needs of decision-makers, which provides an opportunity for students to enhance their understanding of how science can be used to inform fire-related policy. As a result, these awards are intended to enable graduate students to conduct research that will supplement and enhance the quality, scope, or applicability of their thesis or dissertation to develop information and products useful to managers and decision-makers. Proposals must demonstrate relevance to fire, fuels, or resource management and include means to directly communicate with managers, when applicable, regarding project outcomes. Proposals must be directly related to the mission and goals of JFSP to be considered. Applicants are encouraged to search the JFSP website (www.firescience.gov) to learn more about the scope of JFSP activities. -- In addition, proposals must directly address management or policy related questions related to one or more of the following topic areas: " Fire behavior " Fire effects " Fuels treatments effectiveness " Post-fire recovery " Social issues and fire -- Proposals on other topics will not be reviewed.

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Proposal Body

Literature Cited

Budget Spreadsheet

Budget Narrative

Data Management Plan

Advisor Letter

CV

Support Letters

List of Acronyms

Closes on Nov 17, 2016

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13-1-01 Climate change and wilfire smoke at regional scale: Vegetation, fuels, fire regimes, and air quality impacts More Information Actions
The Joint Fire Science Program (JFSP) is soliciting proposals to simulate fuels, wildfire regimes, and smoke impacts resulting from projected future scenarios of climate change and associated altered ecosystems. The primary intent is to highlight the potential impact of climate change on wildfire smoke and emissions. View FON

Closed on Nov 16, 2012

13-1-02 Health impairment from exposure to fire smoke: Relationships among the National Ambient Air Quality Standards (NAAQS) and industrial health guidelines More Information Actions
The Joint Fire Science Program (JFSP) is soliciting proposals to assess the relationships among public health-based considerations of risk to vulnerable citizens, and industrial health-based considerations of risk to fire workers. The purpose of this solicitation is to improve our ability to assess risk for both the public and fire workers, and to better understand smoke atmospheric concentration health guidelines for both worker safety and public health. Proposals must be based on a review of the literature and analysis of existing data sets. New data collection campaigns are not intended. New data collection will only be considered for funding if the proposal demonstrates that new data is necessary to address task statement questions. Responsive proposals must address the following questions: * Health standards - What are suggested guidelines for levels of ambient PM (total, 10 and 2.5) where members of the public should be restricted or removed from the smoke environment? What guidelines for fire workers would help maintain fire worker health? What are maximum recommended instantaneous, one-hour, and 24 hour exposure concentrations of smoke PM4, PM2.5, and PM10? How should protection from exposure to individual or combined non-particulate or particulate/gas chemical constituents be factored into public and fire worker safety guidelines? * Hazardous chemicals - Which specific chemicals in fire smoke, including trace chemical substances such as benzene and isocyanic acid, should be included in future indices, guidelines, or studies developed for smoke altered ambient air quality? * Particulate matter metrics - How should particulate matter metrics used by public and industrial health communities be reconciled for an overall assessment of health risk from fire smoke? How do concentrations of PM4 relate to the ambient air quality standard concentrations of PM2.5 and PM10 for typical smoke particulate size distributions as measured from different fire intensities, periods of exposure and clean air recovery, and types of fire (wildfire, prescribed fire) in different ecosystems? View FON

Closed on Nov 16, 2012

13-1-03 Fuels treatment effectiveness: Economics More Information Actions
The Joint Fire Science Program (JFSP) is soliciting proposals that assess the cost effectiveness of fuel treatments at multiple scales. Fuels treatments are implemented to reduce fire suppression costs, enhance safety of fire crews, augment protection of homes and infrastructure, and to meet a variety of ecosystem restoration and resource management objectives. This task statement focuses on quantification of economic trade-offs related to fuels treatment effectiveness. Given that substantial resources are invested in fuel treatments, it is imperative that managers have confidence that fuel treatments are effective in meeting treatment objectives. JFSP expects that results from research funded in response to this task statement will help managers prioritize and evaluate the investment value of fuels treatments. This information is critical to future budget allocation decisions. All proposals submitted under this task statement must directly address at least one of the following questions, and have a high likelihood of producing information useful to managers: * Treatment costs - What are the costs associated with different treatment types and re-treatment intervals? What are the least-cost re-treatment intervals to meet fire behavior objectives? * Avoided wildfire costs - Are fuel treatment costs justified on the basis of saved suppression costs? How do fuels treatments influence wildfire management and suppression decisions and costs? How do the costs of implementing various wildland fire suppression strategies compare to fuel treatment costs? * Influence of scale - How do the temporal and spatial scales of fuels treatment implementation influence cost effectiveness? How do the effects of multiple treatments implemented over space and time influence cost effectiveness? View FON

Closed on Nov 16, 2012

13-1-04 Fuels treatment effectiveness: Ecosystem restoration More Information Actions
The Joint Fire Science Program (JFSP) is soliciting proposals that assess the effectiveness of joint vegetation management and fuels treatments in restoring ecosystem composition, structure, and function. JFSP expects that results from research funded in response to this task statement will help managers weigh the contributions of vegetation management and fuels treatments towards meeting ecosystem restoration objectives. Responsive proposals must evaluate treatments that have fuels reduction to achieve a specific desired range of future fire behavior as an explicit objective. All proposals submitted under this task statement must directly address at least one of the following questions, and have a high likelihood of producing information useful to managers: * Metrics - What metrics have been used to characterize the effectiveness of fuels treatments at meeting ecosystem restoration objectives? What are the characteristics of useful metrics? Which metrics have potential for effective and broad usage? * Scale - How do vegetation management and fuels treatment effects on ecosystem restoration vary by spatial and temporal scale? At what scales can vegetation management and fuels treatments be effective at meeting ecosystem restoration objectives? * Wildfires - How do fuels treatments affect the attainment of ecosystem restoration objectives by their influence on selection of wildland fire suppression strategies? Is this effect realized in the near term or the long term? View FON

Closed on Nov 16, 2012

13-1-05 Masticated fuelbeds effects on combustion and fire behavior More Information Actions
The Joint Fire Science Program (JFSP) is soliciting proposals that assess the effects of mastication fuels treatments on combustion and fire behavior. JFSP is particularly interested in proposals that collect new field data of masticated fuelbeds and fire behavior. Proposals that include modeled fire behavior must include independent field data sets to evaluate model predictions. All proposals submitted under this task statement must directly address the following topics, and have a high likelihood of producing information useful to managers: * Fuelbeds - What are the effects of mastication treatments on fuelbeds? What are the effects of masticated fuel particle size and fuelbed depth on fuelbed moisture? * Combustion and fire behavior - How do changes in masticated fuel particle size, fuelbed depth, and fuelbed moisture influence combustion processes, fire intensity, and fire spread? Do masticated fuel beds increase smoldering combustion and the possibility of holdover embers in complex fuelbeds? * Temporal changes  How long does it take for masticated fuel beds to decompose, and how does this affect fire behavior? How are these results affected by depth of fuel bed, species, particle size, and geographic area? View FON

Closed on Nov 16, 2012

13-1-06 Compatibility of fire, fuels and rehabilitation treatments with T&E gallinaceous birds More Information Actions
The Joint Fire Science Program (JFSP) is soliciting proposals that investigate the compatibility of fire, fuels and rehabilitation activities with habitat and population restoration of gallinaceous bird species that are federally listed as Candidate, Threatened, or Endangered. These species frequently occur in areas intended for fuels management or in areas affected by wildfire, necessitating close coordination of fuels and fire management activities with species conservation and recovery plans. JFSP seeks research that investigates the compatibility of fire, fuels, and rehabilitation activities with species conservation needs, and produces results that could be used to improve the effectiveness of these activities. View FON

Closed on Nov 16, 2012

13-2-01 Conference Support More Information Actions
The Joint Fire Science Program (JFSP) invites proposals for co-sponsorship of regional, national, or international conferences. International conferences must show a demonstrated benefit to fire or fuels management in the U.S. Proposals must identify how the planned conference will support the JFSP mission. Proposals are limited to $5,000 for regional conferences, and $10,000 for national or international conferences. Conferences must be scheduled within two years of the FON closing date to be eligible. View FON

Closed on Nov 16, 2012

13-3-01 Graduate Research Innovation (GRIN) Award More Information Actions
In partnership with the Association for Fire Ecology, the Joint Fire Science Program (JFSP) invites current MS and PhD graduate students enrolled in US colleges or universities in the fields of wildland fire and related human dimensions and ecological sciences to apply for a Graduate Research Innovation (GRIN) award. The purpose of these awards is to enhance graduate students exposure to and interaction with fire and fuels managers, to develop appreciation and understanding of fire and fuels managers information and research needs, and to augment already planned research to develop information and/or products useful to managers. JFSP recognizes that graduate students of today are the managers, scientists, and leaders of tomorrow. These awards allow graduate students to conduct research that will supplement and enhance the quality, scope, or applicability of their thesis or dissertation, and to build skills needed for independent inquiry. Proposals must describe new, unfunded work that extends ongoing or planned research that is the subject of a thesis or dissertation that has been approved by the graduate students advisory committee. Proposals must be directly related to the mission and goals of JFSP to be considered. Applicants are encouraged to search the JFSP website (www.firescience.gov) to learn more about the scope of JFSP activities. In addition, proposals must directly address one of the following topics: * Climate change and fire (e.g., fire behavior, fire effects, fire regime) * Fuel management effectiveness and effects (e.g., treatment longevity, T&E or invasive species, carbon balance, pile burning, mastication treatments, WUI issues) * Smoke or emissions assessments * Social issues and fire (e.g., community preparation, transfer and use of science, public perceptions) Proposals on other topics will not be reviewed. View FON

Closed on Nov 16, 2012

13-4-01 Dataset Archival More Information Actions
The Joint Fire Science Program (JFSP) invites proposals for new or supplemental funds to document and submit fire and fuels related datasets to an actively managed data repository. The purpose of this activity is to make high quality datasets available to the research community for future research. Proposals must describe the quality assurance and control measures that have been used to ensure a high quality dataset, and describe the types of studies that could benefit from these data. Data and metadata submission must be complete within one year of the data archival project start date for completed projects, and submitted with the final report for ongoing projects. Proposals are limited to four pages and $10,000. Institutions interested in submitting proposals that include archival of datasets from multiple projects may exceed $10,000 with prior approval by the JFSP Program Manager (John Cissel, jcissel@blm.gov). View FON

Closed on Nov 16, 2012