Print Friendly and PDF


Advanced Search Results Detail

Project ID: 14-5-01-25

Year: 2014

Date Started: 10/01/2014

Ending Date:  09/30/2017

Title: Spatiotemporal Evaluation of Fuel Treatment and Previous Wildfire Effects on Suppression Costs

Project Proposal Abstract: The proposed project will quantify the effects of hazardous fuels treatments on suppression costs of subsequent wildfires. Spatial econometric models of daily fire suppression costs will be estimated to determine if and to what spatial and temporal extent hazardous fuels treatments and previous wildfires reduced observed wildfire suppression costs for a sample of recent fires that have interacted with previously treated and burned areas. Effects of different fuel treatment types (including wildfire), sizes, and intensities on suppression costs will be estimated for at least 85 fires sampled across different ecosystems (including underrepresented ecosystems). In addition to considering spatial spillovers (autoregression) of suppression costs, we will investigate how time since treatment interacts with other biophysical and environmental factors to influence suppression costs. We will leverage existing datasets on the location, type and intensity of previously treated areas with observed wildfire suppression costs, and use a combination of geospatial analysis and spatial econometric modeling techniques to better understand how hazardous fuels treatments differentially affect wildfire suppression costs. The study results will be highly relevant to managers for comparing expected suppression-cost savings from different fuel treatment scenarios in various ecosystems. This proposal addresses the following two questions and a statement that were highlighted in the FON: 1. How do the costs of implementing various wildland fire suppression strategies compare to fuel treatment costs? 2. What is the expected decay of effectiveness over time following fuel treatments, by vegetation type, by climate conditions and by fuel treatment method and intensity? 3. Evaluate trade-offs among fuels treatment costs and potentially avoided wildfire suppression costs. To evaluate how fuel treatments (including wildfire) affect daily suppression costs, it is essential to have a good understanding what day any given wildfire intersects with a fuel treatment; this is possible by integrating downscaled daily MODIS satellite data or agency generated fire progression maps with daily expenses as reported in I-Suite. Methods developed by Miller and Parks (JFSP Project #12-1-03-19) for quantifying the effectiveness and longevity of wildfire to act as a fuel treatment will also be applied to other treatment types (e.g., intermediate thin), thereby enhancing our ability to evaluate how all treatment types affect fire suppression costs.

Principal Investigator: Helen T. Naughton

Agency/Organization: University of Montana

Branch or Dept: Economics Department


Other Project Collaborators

Type

Name

Agency/Organization

Branch or Dept

Agreements Contact

Cindy D. Gordon

Forest Service

RMRS-Rocky Mountain Research Station

Budget Contact

Cindy D. Gordon

Forest Service

RMRS-Rocky Mountain Research Station

Collaborator/Contributor

Kevin M. Barnett

University of Montana

Collaborator/Contributor

Carol L. Miller

Forest Service

RMRS-Aldo Leopold Wilderness Research Institute

Collaborator/Contributor

Sean A. Parks

Forest Service

RMRS-Aldo Leopold Wilderness Research Institute

Funding Cooperator

Sean A. Parks

Forest Service

RMRS-Aldo Leopold Wilderness Research Institute


Project Locations

Consortium

California

Northern Rockies

Northwest

South

Southern Rockies

Southwest


Level

State

Agency

Unit

N/A


Project Deliverables

There is no final report available for this project.
There are no deliverables available for this project.

Supporting Documents

There are no supporting documents available for this project.

Convert PDF documents to an html document using Adobe's online conversion tool.
Download Adobe Acrobat Reader