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Project ID: 07-1-1-01

Year: 2007

Date Started: 06/01/2007

Date Completed: 05/31/2012

Title: Evaluating the Effectiveness of Wood Shreds on Post-Fire Erosion

Project Proposal Abstract: The increased size and severity of wildland fires require increasingly effective BAER treatments. A commonly used BAER treatment is mulching, the spreading of agricultural straw by hand or from the air using a helicopter. While widely used and fairly reasonably effective at reducing runoff and erosion, agricultural straw is not a product native to the forest and often carries invasive weeds. There is a growing consensus among Burned Area Emergency Response (BAER) teams that a mulch product native to the forest would be preferable to agricultural straw. Wood shreds, developed by the Missoula Technology & Development Center, are one such product. Made from post-fire slash and small diameter trees, wood shreds have shown promise in reducing erosion in laboratory tests and on road obliteration projects. Slopes and flow path lengths on BAER treated hillsides typically are both steeper and longer than in the demonstrated road obliteration projects, raising questions on the shreds? effectiveness under the harsher post-fire conditions. The authors propose to develop an optimum blend of wood shreds, specifically tailored to post-fire conditions, and to test their erosion reduction potential at the hillslope scale. This proposal is in response to Joint Fire AFP 2007-1-1 Task 1: "Evaluating the effects, effectiveness, and costs of post-fire restoration and/or rehabilitation methods, processes and tools." The optimum length and width specification for post-fire wood shreds will be determined through rainfall simulation on a fine-grained burned forest soil. Following the determination of the optimum dimensions, the erosion reduction ability of the optimized wood shreds will be field-tested at the hillslope scale using concentrated flow simulation techniques and sediment fences installed on a severely burned hillside. Erosion monitoring will be conducted for a period of two years after the fire. This proposal, if funded, will continue to add to the growing body of knowledge concerning effectiveness of post-fire rehabilitation treatments developed by the authors and others. Results from this study will be disseminated through publications in peer-reviewed journals and a General Technical Report on the use of wood shreds in the post-fire environment. The authors are often called upon to make presentations at regional specialists meetings, thus affording an opportunity for the study results to be directly conveyed to BAER team specialists.

Principal Investigator: Peter R. Robichaud

Agency/Organization: Forest Service

Branch or Dept: RMRS-Forestry Sciences Lab-Moscow


Other Project Collaborators

Type

Name

Agency/Organization

Branch or Dept

Co-Principal Investigator

Randy B. Foltz

Forest Service

RMRS-Forestry Sciences Lab-Moscow

Co-Principal Investigator

Charlie Showers

Forest Service

Missoula Technology & Development Center

Federal Cooperator

James Saveland

Forest Service

RMRS-Natural Resources Research Center

Federal Fiscal Representative

Judy A. Perry

Forest Service

RMRS-Forestry Sciences Lab-Fort Collins


Project Locations

Consortium

Alaska

Appalachian

California

Great Basin

Great Plains

Lake States

Oak Woodlands

Northern Rockies

Northwest

Pacific

South

Southern Rockies

Southwest

Tallgrass


Level

State

Agency

Unit

NATIONAL

MULTIPLE

REGIONAL

Interior West

MULTIPLE

REGIONAL

Pacific Coast States

MULTIPLE

NATIONAL

MULTIPLE


Project Deliverables

Final Report view or print

("Results presented in JFSP Final Reports may not have been peer-reviewed and should be interpreted as tentative until published in a peer-reviewed source.")

  ID Type Title
    1787 Government Publication Production and aerial application of wood shreds as a post-fire hillslope erosion mitigation treatme
view or print   2973 Journal Article Catena
    858 Conference/Symposia/Workshop Latest Findings on Effectiveness of Various Postfire Rehabilitation Treatments
    865 Conference/Symposia/Workshop Latest Findings on Effectiveness of Various Postfire Rehabilitation Treatments
    866 Conference/Symposia/Workshop Latest Findings on Effectiveness of Various Postfire Rehabilitation Treatments
    867 Invited Paper/Presentation BAER Research: Progress and Plans
    4580 Invited Paper/Presentation Latest Findings on Postfire Treatment Effectiveness
    4585 Invited Paper/Presentation Reducing the Risk: Improving Our Understanding of Post-Wildfire Erosion Control Effectiveness
    5168 Invited Paper/Presentation Effectiveness of Various Postfire Rehabilitation Treatments
    4541 Invited Paper/Presentation Latest Findings on Postfire Treatment Effectiveness
    3971 Invited Paper/Presentation Update on BAER Research and Effectiveness of Various Postfire Rehabilitation Treatments
    4275 Invited Paper/Presentation BAER Treatment Effectiveness
    6645 Training Session Effectiveness of Various Postfire Rehabilitation Treatments
    6842 Invited Paper/Presentation BAER Tools and Effectiveness of Various Postfire Rehabilitation Treatments
    6705 Invited Paper/Presentation Monitoring Effectiveness of Road Treatments
    6110 Invited Paper/Presentation Field Testing of Wood-Based Biomass Erosion Control Materials on Obliterated Roads
    6533 Invited Paper/Presentation Latest Findings on Postfire Treatment Effectiveness
    6534 Invited Paper/Presentation Postfire Treatment Effectiveness: Current Findings
    6535 Invited Paper/Presentation Post-Fire Treatment Effectiveness
    6536 Invited Paper/Presentation Using Simulated Rill Experiments to Measure Post-fire Erosion in Pacific Northwest and Southern British Columbia Forest
    6537 Training Session Lastest Findings of the Effectiveness of Various Postfire Erosion Control Treatments
view or print   5545 Photo Hillshope plot fences to measure erosion from the Terrace Mountain Fire, BC, Canada
view or print   5546 Photo Rainfall simulation experiment at Terrace Mountain Fire, BC, Canada
view or print   5547 Photo Rill simulation experiment at Terrace Mountain Fire, BC, Canada. Green dye is for photo enhancement.
view or print   5548 Photo Wood shreds being picked up with Heli-Claw
view or print   5549 Photo Wood shreds being drop from a cargo net and Heli-Claw.

Supporting Documents

There are no supporting documents available for this project.

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